${site. data. firmName}${SEMFirmNameAlt}
Schedule a free consultation All major credit cards accepted
Legal Fee Financing
310-557-0062

Famed rocker Steven Tyler knows all about cease-and-desist letters

It’s hard to say whether legendary rock star Steven Tyler has ever written a song entitled, “Been There, Done That.”

If he hasn’t, maybe he should. He can borrow freely from his personal experience as the repeated author of cease-and-desist letters written to stop the undesired use of his musical creations.

Tyler, who is the flamboyant singer/front man for the Hall of Fame rock group Aerosmith, is decidedly not a Donald Trump fan. He – to be spot-on accurate here, let’s just his legal team – first sent then-presidential candidate Trump such a communication three years ago. Tyler was angered that the Trump campaign team used Aerosmith’s famous song “Dream On” without first garnering the band’s permission.

Tyler says he would have never given it. And he is now saying the same thing in what is essentially a round-two Tyler/Trump spat concerning the tune “Livin’ on the Edge.” That song was played recently at a political rally.

Tyler is clearly incensed that it was, terming its airing “egregious” for a number of reasons.

For starters, asserts the singer, the Trump team is patently aware through the past communications and the band’s stated comments that Aerosmith objects to any use of its music by the current presidential administration. Tyler’s representatives state that, given the Trump team’s knowledge of Aerosmith’s antipathy and multiple cease/desist letters sent in the past, their decision to again play an Aerosmith tune is “clearly willful.”

Tyler’s letter also states that the playing of his music in such a context falsely conveys to the public that he agreed to the use and supports the administration. Moreover, Tyler argues that playing Livin’ on the Edge at a Trump rally violates the federal Lanham Act addressing trademarks. The singer states that doing so is likely to confuse or deceive the public about a perceived connection between Tyler and the president.

There is no such association, says Tyler. And he wants the president to stop playing his music at public political functions.

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information